{ concert posters }

art, Design, Home, Main, Uncategorized

I love music more than anything. It doesn’t matter what kind it is. I love it. I will go to literally any concert (side note: I did in fact attend a One Direction concert in high school, and I did not in fact know the names of any of the members at the time. Basically a crime in a setting where every girls was wearing a shirt with “HARRY LIAM NIALL ZAYN” glittered across their boobs).

A lot of people will say “Oh, I like all different genres” when you ask them what music they like. And it’s a total cop-out, but I’m genuinely one of those people. I legitimately love 60’s rock as much as I love 90’s pop, and even 80’s (thought by many to be the worst decade for music, but I beg to differ- what other kind of music makes you so happy when you listen to it?), up through today. The three days I spent at Lollapalooza last year in Chicago were three of the best days of my life, because I got to see Paul McCartney, Metallica, and Kid Cudi within the same 24 hours. I got to live in basically three different decades of music.

lolla8

Along with music comes art. They go hand in hand more than anything. I mean, musicians are also called “artists.” No coincidence. But my point is the album artwork, tour t-shirt designs, logos, photo shoots, music videos, and concert posters, that are all part of the music business. And that’s where these beauties come in:

arcadefire.jpg

bobdylan

pinkfloydthecurefubiz.net

pixies

Shakespeare’s Ophelia reference in that last one. Whoa.

Music has always lent itself to visuals, what with the “theater of the mind” and all that. When you listen to a song, you have an idea in your head of what’s going on, and you usually want to be there (unless it’s a Bruno Mars song).

The posters add to the universe created by the band, whether imaginary or real, and there’s nothing like the style of a classic concert poster. It has this surreal vintage effect, and I love it when newer bands like Arctic Monkeys and Arcade Fire use it. There are even print shops that still creates posters using the ages-old letterpress technique, especially in Nashville, just to get that authentic, artful, hand-drawn look.

That’s something not even Illustrator can recreate.

Your 20’s/40’s/60’s/80’s/2000’s music fan,

A

 

 

 

 

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